Heading Toward Hawaii: Tropical Storm Flossie

By Tom Yulsman | July 26, 2013 9:13 pm

This animation captured by a GOES weather satellite, shows water vapor associated with Tropical Storm Flossie as it swirled in the Pacific Ocean on Friday, July 26. (Animation: NOAA.)

| See updates below | Tropical Storm Flossie, which is churning toward the west in the Pacific Ocean toward the Hawaiian Islands, has strengthened a bit, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

7/27/13  Update: Since I posted this last night, the storm has been weakening a bit due to wind shear, drier air, and cooler sea surface temperatures. But it still poses a potential threat to Hawaii.

As of 2 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time today, Flossie’s maximum sustained wind speed was 60 miles per hour. | 7/27/13  Update: Now down to 50 mph.

What impact she may have, if any, on Hawaii is still unclear. Here’s what the latest NOAA public advisory has to say:

THERE ARE NO COASTAL WATCHES OR WARNINGS IN EFFECT.

INTERESTS IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS SHOULD MONITOR FLOSSIE THROUGH THE
WEEKEND.

7/27/13  Update: The National Weather Service in Honolulu  is now saying that very heavy rains and flash flooding are possible in Hawaii on Monday and Tuesday.

Here’s how the forecast for Flossie’s winds are shaping up:

 | 7/27/13  Update: Click here for the latest map of wind speed probabilities.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: select, Top Posts, Weather
  • Teraisa

    Keep us updated! Thank you. ~Teraisa

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ImaGeo

ImaGeo is a visual blog focusing on the intersection of imagery, imagination and Earth. It focuses on spectacular visuals related to the science of our planet, with an emphasis (although not an exclusive one) on the unfolding Anthropocene Epoch.

About Tom Yulsman

Tom Yulsman is Director of the Center for Environmental Journalism and a Professor of Journalism at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He also continues to work as a science and environmental journalist with more than 30 years of experience producing content for major publications. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Audubon, Climate Central, Columbia Journalism Review, Discover, Nieman Reports, and many other publications. He has held a variety of editorial positions over the years, including a stint as editor-in-chief of Earth magazine. Yulsman has written one book: Origins: the Quest for Our Cosmic Roots, published by the Institute of Physics in 2003.

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