Archive for July 15th, 2009

Hold Off Attacking Holdren–Again

By Chris Mooney | July 15, 2009 10:37 pm

I just got to La Jolla for the start of the book tour….will be speaking at Warwick’s tomorrow evening, one of my favorite bookstores in the whole country.

Anyways, there are many things to link. We’re starting to do radio interviews about the book, for instance, and a good one just went up with “Word of Mouth,” a show on New Hampshire Public Radio hosted by Virginia Prescott. You can listen here.

My latest Science Progress column also just went up–it’s another defense of Obama science adviser John Holdren, now being attacked for positions he didn’t hold thirty years ago due to misreadings of a book on which he was the third author. In other words, typical right wing attacks, all smoke no fire, and an utter distraction from what’s important for the country. You can read my defense here.

With the tour now beginning, posting may become somewhat more infrequent, but I think Sheril will be covering tomorrow….

PZ Myers vs. Unscientific America: Part III

By The Intersection | July 15, 2009 11:26 am

In this post, we complete our rebuttals to PZ Myers’ review of our book, Unscientific America. For those who’ve just arrived, we previously laid out the course our response would take here, and began to respond here and here. This is the fourth and final post.

9. Bigotry. At the end of his review, Myers says something astonishing. He claims that our “bigotry blinds [us] to a range of approaches offered by the ‘New Atheists’…a group that is not so closed to the wide range of necessarily differing tactics that such a deep problem requires as Mooney and Kirshenbaum are.”

This is a baseless accusation. Chris is an atheist, and he is not bigoted against himself, his mother (an outspoken secular humanist), or any other atheists. Sheril is Jewish an agnostic, and not bigoted against Chris or any other atheists, either.

Myers provides no evidence of our supposed biogtry. He just makes an inflammatory accusation, one not at all conducive to rational or calm discussion.

It is precisely this kind of rhetoric that led us to address Myers so directly in Unscientific America.

10. The Trouble With PZ Myers. In his review, Myers doesn’t address our criticisms of him–of his public writings and actions. But we will end by elaborating upon why, in the wake of the communion wafer desecration, we decided we had to speak out about Myers in a way that would really be heard.

Though we have not said so until now, Myers is among the central reasons we left ScienceBlogs. There were many factors involved, of course, but one was our shock at what he calls “Crackergate.” We describe the full incident in the book, but let us quote from Myers’ words when he closed off comments (there had been over 2,000) after posting his picture of the defiled eucharist with a rusty nail driven through it:

What effort I put into [the desecration] was not in response to the reality of your silly deity, but in response to the reality of your dangerous delusions. Those are real, all right, and they need to be belittled and weakened. But don’t confuse the fact that I find you and your church petty, foolish, twisted, and hateful to be a testimonial to the existence of your petty, foolish, twisted, hateful god.

Now I’m afraid I’m going to have to close this thread. Its purpose has been well served: the fanatical Catholics and their crazy beliefs have been fully exposed. Over 2300 comments on this subject in 20 hours is quite enough.

Watching all of this, we were appalled. We could not see what this act could possibly have to do with promoting science and reason. It contributed nothing to the public understanding or appreciation of science, and everything to a nasty, ugly culture war that hurts and divides us all.

We recognize that Myers writes entertainingly and sometimes hilariously; we know he’s kind and soft-spoken in person; and we realize he describes science accurately and insightfully. And we understand he’s a very good teacher as well.

Nevertheless, in his online persona–and nowhere more than with the wafer desecration–we believe he cultivates a climate of extremism, incivility and, indeed, unreason (the opposite of calm and respectful debate and exchange) at ScienceBlogs. And it is past time that someone spoke out about that, as we did in Unscientific America.

For too long, people in the science blogosphere have tiptoed around Myers. After all, he can send a lot of angry commenters your way. And he, and they, are unrelenting in their criticisms, their attacks, and so on. Just read our threads over the last week–it’s all there, the vast majority from people who have not read our book and do not seem inclined to do so.

But we’re not afraid of Myers or his commenters. They can leave hundreds of posts on our blog–we readily allow it–but our book will be read by a different and far more open-minded audience. It’s already happening. And that audience will largely agree that Myers’ communion wafer desecration was offensive and counterproductive, and that more generally, he epitomizes the current problems with the communication of science on the Internet.

We know how many others agree with us, because we have heard from them. We also know the standards of intellectual decency, fairness, and so on that we’ve learned from years of journalism and in academia. And if, as our book proposes, we are going to be training young science communicators, they must learn at least two basic lessons they will not be getting from Myers: civility and tolerance.

Our core concern, though, isn’t really about Myers or his blog. What worries us is what they say about the world of American science as it appears on the Internet. For Myers is, as we all know, the most popular blogger on the most popular science blogging site–and has a horde of loyal followers who see themselves as the disciples of reason, and swear by “science” (when they’re not just swearing).

And this is his most famous performance: Desecrating a communion wafer.

That doesn’t just say something unflattering about Myers–it says something devastating about all of us.

Shark!

By Sheril Kirshenbaum | July 15, 2009 9:25 am

This basking shark (not dangerous–they mainly eat plankton) washed ashore yesterday just a few miles east of Jones Beach in Long Island. The Washington Post estimates that the critter is 2,000 pounds and 20 feet long while CNN reports it may be 5,000 pounds and over 26 feet. Regardless, what an amazing creature!

shark.png

It appears to have died from some kind of illness and researchers are examining the carcass before it’s buried in sand dunes nearby on the beach. Usually basking sharks die in the ocean.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Marine Science
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