Arizona Cardinals (SCIENCE) Cheerleaders: Ask them anything.

By The Intersection | August 16, 2011 6:30 pm

Guest blog post from Darlene Cavalier, founder of Science Cheerleader and Science For Citizens and contributing editor at Discover magazine.

Arizona Cardinals Science-minded Cheerleaders Will Take Your Questions Now.

Six Arizona Cardinals cheerleaders, pursuing science and engineering careers, are now fielding questions from the public. Ask them anything. Questions with the most votes from the public will be answered by the cheerleaders during a videotaped interview on August 25.

The Science Cheerleaders are part of a troop of more than 100 current and former NFL and NBA cheerleaders pursuing science careers. Their goal is to playfully challenge stereotypes and inspire young women to consider science and technology fields.

These women are mathematicians, medical doctors, chemists and engineers. Their goal is to challenge the stereotypical image of
female scientists as lonely, unhappy, lab rats and show young girls that there is another path forward.

The Science Cheerleaders have demonstrated an ability to connect to groups traditionally underrepresented in science and technology fields, potentially broadening educational and workforce funnel.

Cheerleaders from the Redskins, Titans, Chiefs, Texans, Eagles, and Rams among others perform across the nation, shaking their pom poms and divulging science and math facts about energy, electricity, atoms, math, and engineering. They even get crowds to participate in citizen science projects.

At the live events, the Science Cheerleaders are often asked, “What’s it like to be a cheerleader AND a scientist?” or “When did you first know you wanted to be an engineer?” “How do you deal with the extreme stereotypes?”

Now’s your chance! The 2011-2012 Arizona Cardinals Cheerleaders have offered to answer the most popular questions
submitted through Tuesday August 23rd (one week!). We’ll be visiting their training facility in Tempe, AZ, the following week to get all the answers.

People can submit questions to these Science Cheerleaders by tweeting to @SciCheer or commenting on the blog post,
the YouTube video, or Facebook Page.

Here’s a sample of who some of these remarkable women are. (Take a look and then ask ‘em anything by August 23rd!)

Hi, I’m Samantha, and I’m not just you’re average cheerleader; I’m studying Engineering Management with a focus in Mechanical Engineering at Arizona State University. I am also a national member of the Society of Women Engineers and currently interning at Microchip Technology. This is my rookie year as an Arizona Cardinals Cheerleader, but I have been dancing my whole life and even won the national pom championship my senior year of high school.

Hi, my name is Maria, and I am a rookie member of the 2011 Arizona Cardinals Cheerleaders. I graduated from Rice University with a degree in political science and earned my J.D. from the University of Arizona in 2010. When it’s not gameday, you can find me at work as an Advocacy Specialist for the Girl Scouts, where I collaborate with local lawmakers on policies to provide increased exposure to the national Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math initiative. Helping to promote the next generation of female scientists, engineers, IT professionals, and mathematicians is one of the most rewarding aspects of my job!

My name is Jacque, and I am a Licensed Professional Civil Engineer who received my B.S.E. in Civil Engineering from Arizona State University. I have been cheerleading since the age of five, and I am proud and honored to now be a professional cheerleader and a rookie member of the amazing Arizona Cardinals Cheerleaders.

Got a question? Something on your mind? Ask ‘em anything before August 23!

Learn more about the Science Cheerleaders.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Guest Posts, Uncategorized

Comments (13)

  1. Hugo Schmidt

    I have to admit, that’s certainly something you don’t see this side of the sink.

  2. 1985

    Hi, I’m Samantha, and I’m not just you’re average cheerleader; I’m studying Engineering Management with a focus in Mechanical Engineering at Arizona State University. I am also a national member of the Society of Women Engineers and currently interning at Microchip Technology. This is my rookie year as an Arizona Cardinals Cheerleader, but I have been dancing my whole life and even won the national pom championship my senior year of high school.
    Hi, my name is Maria, and I am a rookie member of the 2011 Arizona Cardinals Cheerleaders. I graduated from Rice University with a degree in political science and earned my J.D. from the University of Arizona in 2010. When it’s not gameday, you can find me at work as an Advocacy Specialist for the Girl Scouts, where I collaborate with local lawmakers on policies to provide increased exposure to the national Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math initiative. Helping to promote the next generation of female scientists, engineers, IT professionals, and mathematicians is one of the most rewarding aspects of my job!
    My name is Jacque, and I am a Licensed Professional Civil Engineer who received my B.S.E. in Civil Engineering from Arizona State University. I have been cheerleading since the age of five, and I am proud and honored to now be a professional cheerleader and a rookie member of the amazing Arizona Cardinals Cheerleaders.

    None of these fields is science

  3. 1985: Close to 100 others at http://www.sciencecheerleader.com You’ll find plenty who fit your definition of science, there.

  4. 1985

    So why not pick one of them then? Either they are mostly engineers, and on top of that, on the very soft side of engineering, or the person who wrote this does not have his definition of science right. Either way, it ‘s not good

  5. This is an interview with the AZ cardinals cheerleaders. If you’d like to ask them a question, please do! The person who wrote this is a “she”…me.

  6. Dan

    I’d be happy to ask any of them a question, certainly rather than listem to someone who would rather criticize their terrific accoplishments! Like, “How does it feel to be a terrific role model for young girls who get to see that beutiful Can = Accomplished?” There see. That was not so difficult! ; )

  7. Dan

    And incidently engineering requires enormous amounts of scientific knowledge.

  8. 1985

    7. Dan Says:
    August 18th, 2011 at 12:02 am
    And incidently engineering requires enormous amounts of scientific knowledge.

    Which does not make it science. Neither is political science a real science let alone law.

    6. Dan Says:
    August 17th, 2011 at 11:59 pm
    I’d be happy to ask any of them a question, certainly rather than listem to someone who would rather criticize their terrific accoplishments!

    It has nothing to do with anyone’s accomplishments, it’s just that you are never going to improve the state of scientific literacy or loosen the grip that anti-scientific thinking and anti-intellectualism in general have on our society by promoting a “See, cheerleaders can do science too” line. The very act of doing so is part of the problem with the current place of science in our society.

  9. The current place of science in our society has lots to do with the image people have of scientists as being social misfits. So, I completely disagree with you, 1985. Demonstrating that “socially fit” people are scientists, too, can go a long way towards loosening the grips you described above.
    Another benefit of using science-minded cheerleaders to spread the gospel of science: they’re an optimistic group. Not something we tend to see much of in the science community, eh?

  10. 1985

    Well, you see, that’s the problem. Simply by saying that “‘socially fit’ people can be scientists too” you are already relegating science to something less important than being “socially fit”. And that’s plain wrong.

    It absolutely does not matter whether you are socially fit or not, what matters is whether you understand the world around you. Which you can not do if you are scientifically illiterate. A socially fit moron is a moron first and socially fit second.

    It also matters very little whether you are optimistic or not. We have this cultural cult of positive thinking, but it’s just that, a cult which has nothing to do with reality. Optimistic thinking is of zero value, realistic thinking is what matter. That’s why scientists tend to be seem pessimistic – because they are the group that is most realistically thinking of all people in society and when the social norm is to be optimistic, they naturally look pessimistic.

    But so what? What matters is whether you are right or wrong, not whether you are “socially fit”, optimistic, or whatever.

    That’s why this post is such an outrageous silliness.

  11. JT Lewis

    Whoa, what’s with the rants?
    Reminds me of Will Ferrell in “ELF” “He’s an angry elf, must be from the South Pole. ”

    I myself had read “Their goal is to playfully challenge stereotypes and inspire young women to consider science and technology fields” A noble goal. Emphasis on ‘playful’.

    Dan ‘gets’ it. The blogger who ranted, “The very act of doing so is part of the problem with the current place of science in our society.”? not so much.

    As they say, though, there’s o such thing as bad publicity. So GO Cheerleaders. GO Science!

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