The Island of Science Writing

By Carl Zimmer | February 18, 2009 7:26 pm

appledore-600.jpgOver the past two summers I’ve paid visits to the lovely Isles of Shoals to speak to students and scientists at the Shoals Marine Lab. (I wrote a post about my 2007 trip here, and last summer’s journey here.) This year I’ll be trying something new: I’m teaching a week-long college-credit course on science writing. It will run from August 10 to 17, and, like all classes at Shoals, it will be intense. We’ll read a lot, write a lot more, and take advantage of the unique environment of Appledore Island, where you should never be surprised to encounter an underwater archaeologist, an ornithologist banding migratory birds, or a vet dissecting a seal on a picnic table.

The Lab will be taking registrations for the next few weeks. By the way, here’s the whole course list for the summer, including a class on the history of oceans that will start at Cornell and move through time and space to Appledore.

Image: Rick Holt, Wikipedia

CATEGORIZED UNDER: General
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Comments (4)

  1. Star

    “collete-credit course”
    typo?

  2. Typo fixed. We’ll spend a couple hours of the class on spelling, too….

  3. SML is an interesting place – I did my undergraduate research out there. I noticed that you didn’t mention the pleasures of trying to write while in the midst of a screeching gull colony!

  4. Sarah O'Connor

    This sounds like a neat course. Speaking of learning opportunities and maritime history, you should take the time to check out the small museum on the next island over, Star Island!

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The Loom

A blog about life, past and future. Written by DISCOVER contributing editor and columnist Carl Zimmer.

About Carl Zimmer

Carl Zimmer writes about science regularly for The New York Times and magazines such as DISCOVER, which also hosts his blog, The LoomHe is the author of 12 books, the most recent of which is Science Ink: Tattoos of the Science Obsessed.

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