Parasites+Radiolab!

By Carl Zimmer | September 8, 2009 12:41 am

Radiolab and parasites. A match made in parasitic heaven. If you haven’t discovered this excellent radio program, check out the first episode of their sixth season. During the first 20 minutes of the show, I persuade the hosts of the show, Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich, that parasites are not degenerate or evil, but rather sophisticated creatures that have a huge influence on humanity and the entire natural world (the basic message in my book, Parasite Rex). The rest of the show delves into some particularly cool parasite tales. Check it out.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Talks, The Parasite Files

Comments (7)

  1. Well said about the parasites. This reminds me of this TED talk that is really interesting.

    I’m glad you pointed this out as it looks really interesting too.

  2. I’m reading Parasite Rex right now.

  3. Awesomeness defined!

  4. Just got around to listening and it was awesome, thanks. Makes me want to read P. Rex, but I have a friend–an expert for the CDC on the T. cruzi parasite–that frowns at it when she sees it on the shelf, so I’ll have to be sneaky reading it and then ask her what it is that she thinks you got wrong.

  5. SplendidMonkey

    This show aired in Minnesota on MPR today :)

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The Loom

A blog about life, past and future. Written by DISCOVER contributing editor and columnist Carl Zimmer.

About Carl Zimmer

Carl Zimmer writes about science regularly for The New York Times and magazines such as DISCOVER, which also hosts his blog, The LoomHe is the author of 12 books, the most recent of which is Science Ink: Tattoos of the Science Obsessed.

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