Category: Science Tattoo Emporium

Science Ink in New York: This Tuesday

By Carl Zimmer | January 20, 2012 12:52 am

This Tuesday I’ll be giving a talk at the New York Academy of Sciences about Science Ink–complete with live tattooed scientists!

Here are some of the details

When: Tuesday, January 24, 2012, 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM. (A reception will follow.)
Where: The New York Academy of Sciences
7 World Trade Center
250 Greenwich Street, 40th floor
New York, NY 10007-2157
212.298.8600

Get $10 dollars off full-price tickets by using the promo code ZIMMER. Register here: http://www.nyas.org/scienceink

 

See you there!

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Science Tattoo Emporium, Talks

Science Ink on this week's Science Friday

By Carl Zimmer | January 11, 2012 1:36 pm

I’ll be on National Public Radio’s Science Friday this week to talk about Science Ink. Host Ira Flatow and I will be chatting during the 3 pm EST hour. In the meantime, the folks at Science Friday have set up a slide show preview.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Science Tattoo Emporium, Talks

The Wall Street Journal ogles tattoos, and more #scienceink news

By Carl Zimmer | January 9, 2012 10:33 am

1. Good morning. Over the weekend, the Wall Street Journal features Science Ink in their Visualizer Column. I stopped by their offices on Friday and recorded an interview with WSJ editor Gary Rosen, which I’ve embedded below.

2. In other news…Amazon has Science Ink back in stock, and they’re offering it at half price.

3. The Huffington Post Science section featured Science Ink, which surely must bode well for its future.

4. I’ll be on the radio this week talking about the book–details to come!

5. Finally, let me just remind New Yorkers that I’ll be speaking at the New York Academy of Sciences about Science Ink on Tuesday, January 24, at 7 pm.

Here are some of the details

When: Tuesday, January 24, 2012, 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM. (A reception will follow.)
Where: The New York Academy of Sciences
7 World Trade Center
250 Greenwich Street, 40th floor
New York, NY 10007-2157
212.298.8600

Get $10 dollars off admission by using the promo code ZIMMER. Register here:http://www.nyas.org/scienceink

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Science Tattoo Emporium, Talks

January 24: Science Ink comes to the New York Academy of Sciences

By Carl Zimmer | January 3, 2012 12:38 pm

Greetings, Gothamites! If you’re free Tuesday, January 24, please join me for a talk at the New York Academy of Sciences. I’ll be delivering an anthropological lecture about an intriguing sub-culture that expresses itself with body inscriptions. I speak, of course, of scientists with tattoos.

At my last talk, at the Harvard Museum of Natural History, the evening was enhanced with the presence of actual, flesh-and-blood scientists with tattoos, some of whom appear in the pages of Science Ink. If you are a member of this inky, geeky clan and are planning on coming to the New York talk, please let me know so that I can try to work you into the presentation.

Here are some of the details

When: Tuesday, January 24, 2012, 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM. (A reception will follow.)
Where: The New York Academy of Sciences
7 World Trade Center
250 Greenwich Street, 40th floor
New York, NY 10007-2157
212.298.8600

Get $10 dollars off full-price tickets by using the promo code ZIMMER. Register here: http://www.nyas.org/scienceink

 

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Science Tattoo Emporium, Talks

The Science Ink of Moby Dick

By Carl Zimmer | December 10, 2011 11:51 am

I’ve been doing some research on the long cultural history of tattoos in preparation for my talk about Science Ink at Harvard on Tuesday. I’m a hard-core Moby Dick fan (this blog’s name comes from there), so it was a delight to stumble across a passage on tattoos, which I had forgotten.

Queequeg, readers may recall, was covered with tattoos. Here’s how Ishmael describes them:

This tattooing had been the work of a departed prophet and seer of his island, who, by those hieroglyphic marks, had written out on his body a complete theory of the heavens and the earth, and a mystical treatise on the art of attaining truth; so that Queequeg in his own proper person was a riddle to unfold; a wondrous work in one volume; but whose mysteries not even himself could read, though his own live heart beat against them; and these mysteries were therefore destined in the end to moulder away with the living parchment whereon they were inscribed, and so be unsolved to the last.

[Image: Rockwell Kent, Plattsburgh State Art Museum]

 

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Science Tattoo Emporium

#scienceink round-up: Der Spiegel, The Toronto Star, and more

By Carl Zimmer | December 2, 2011 11:33 pm

It’s been a busy week for Science Ink!

1. Science Ink was on TV. The Daily Planet, a Canadian science news show on the Discovery Channel, interviewed me about my favorite tattoos.

2.The Irish Times put Science Ink on top of its list of science books for holiday gifts. (As did MSNBC and io9.)

3. Der Spiegel takes a look.

4. The Toronto Star has a whole package on Science Ink in Saturday’s issue: A Q&A with yours trulyan article by Megan Ogilvie about Toronto-area scientists with tattoos, and a slide show of their tattoos. (I was amazed that there were lots of tattoos I had never seen before!)

5. Just a reminder to folks in Boston: I will be giving a lecture at the Harvard Museum of Natural History on Tuesday, 12/13 at 6 pm. The lecture is free and open to the public. (The parking is free too!) Details are here.

[This tattoo of cyanide is from David Lighthart.]

 

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Science Tattoo Emporium

The Observer gets inked (+ more #scienceink news)

By Carl Zimmer | November 28, 2011 10:12 am

1. Science Ink excerpt: The Observer (The Guardian’s sister Sunday magazine) has put together a lovely excerpt from Science Ink. Along with a selection of images, they’ve adapted part of the introductory essay I wrote for the book. Here’s a snippet:

…Some people have watched this growing obsession of mine and scoffed. They see tattoos as nothing but mistakes of youth, fated to sag, or to be scorched off with a laser beam.

But tattoos are etched deep in our species. In 1991, two hikers climbing the Austrian Alps discovered the freeze-dried body of a 5,300-year-old hunter, who came to be known as Ötzi. His skin was exquisitely preserved, including a series of hatch-marks on his back and a cross pattern on his knee. A team of Austrian researchers determined that the tattoos had been made with ashes from a fireplace, which someone had sprinkled into small incisions in Ötzi’s skin.

Tattoos are preserved on other mummies from ancient civilisations, from the Scythians of central Asia to the Chiribaya of Peru. If, through some miracle of preservation, archaeologists find older human skin, I could easily imagine their finding even older tattoos. After all, two hallmarks of Homo sapiens are decoration and self-identification…

Read the rest here.

2. Cyber Monday sale! Both Barnes and Noble and Amazon have decided to offer Science Ink for 50% off. It’s yours for only $12.47. I don’t know if this is just a Cyber Monday offering, so click now.

3. More reviews of Science Ink  Check them out at Tattoosday & Tattoos.net & Southern Fried Science. Several reviewers have pointed out that the book is missing a list of tattoo artists. We did put together a list, but it didn’t get into the first printing due to the publishing schedule. We’ll make sure it’s in subsequent printings; in the meantime, I’ve posted a list here.

 4. Science Tattoos Go to Harvard. I will be giving a lecture at the Harvard Museum of Natural History on Tuesday, 12/13 at 6 pm. The lecture is free and open to the public. (The parking is free too!) Details are here. I will have at least one anthropological specimen on display: this guy. (Any other Boston-area inked scientists, please shoot me an email if you want to participate!)

[Image: A geological cross section from Helen Malenda, from Science Ink]

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Science Tattoo Emporium

The Bipedal Atlas #scienceink

By Carl Zimmer | November 21, 2011 6:49 pm

Zsuzsa Megyery writes,

I’m a student at MIT in the Earth, Atmospheric & Planetary Science Department hoping to solve the glacially-coupled climate problem of global warming by developing efficient carbon sequestration technology. In honor of our beautiful mother Earth, and as a constant reminder of the places I can go under my own human power, I had the world map, minus Antarctica, tattooed on the tops of my feet in a Mercator projection.

It is deeply personal to me–I am Hungarian, with the European continent on one foot–but grew up in the US–so the Western half is on the other side. I have a minimal carbon footprint on our mother Earth, cycling as much as possible for transportation and even hoping to circum-paddle Antarctica some day.

Click here to order a copy of Science Ink: Tattoos of the Science Obsessed.

Click here to view the Science Tattoo Emporium.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Science Tattoo Emporium

#scienceink update: The New York Times does a slide show, and New Scientist approves

By Carl Zimmer | November 7, 2011 6:05 pm

Two pieces of Science Ink related news:

1. The New York Times put together a slide show from the book (including several tattoos that I haven’t published on the blog). Check it out.

2. New Scientist offered this kind review (sub’n required):

“When Carl Zimmer asked on his blog whether tattoos were common among scientists, he unwittingly became the curator of a set of incredible images, and of intimate stories that reveal a love affair with science. We are familiar with the idea that people tattoo themselves with a name or symbol representing the great love in their life. Those who love science are no different. Zimmer was inundated with responses.

“Many are literal representations of a scientist’s obsession with their profession:a tree of life covering a zoology graduate’s back, or a cross section through a mountain chain for a geology student. Others tell more personal stories, such as the neuroscientist with a tattoo of the type of nerve cell that is damaged in Lou Gehrig’s disease, which killed her father. This book gathers up the marvels of science that have touched people so deeply they wanted to embody them. Zimmer’s explanations of these concepts turns what could have been a gimmicky coffee-table picture book into an informative guide to some of the most captivating ideas in science.”

[Update: Links fixed]

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Science Tattoo Emporium

The Toughest Bear in the Universe #scienceink

By Carl Zimmer | November 7, 2011 10:30 am

Spencer Debenport, a plant pathologist at Ohio State University, sports a tattoo of a tardigrade, a microscopic animal known as the water bear. “I have always loved microscopic critters, and there is none other as intriguing as the tardigrade,” he writes.  “The fact that they are so hardy, yet still that odd mixture of ugly/cute drew me to them and the more I read up on them, the more I wanted one permanently on me.  I am also a mycologist, so whenever I look at lichens I get to see loads of these little guys roaming around.”

In Science Ink, I included another tattoo of a tardigrade, and describe it this way:

Tardigrades make the world their hiding place. They live invisibly in the ground, in the muck of ponds and deep-sea sediments, in dunes, in moss, in stone walls, on the tops of mountains, and deep inside glaciers. They go unnoticed thanks to their miniature dimensions: the biggest tardigrades don’t get bigger than a poppy seed. When the naturalist Johann August Ephraim Goeze discovered tardigrades in 1773, he dubbed them kleiner Wasserbär, meaning little water bear. Their stocky bodies and stumpy legs do give them an ursine cast, but there aren’t many bears that have eight legs, or daggers in their mouths that pierce smaller animals or algae cells.

There are also aren’t many bears that could be taken aboard a spacecraft, left out in the vacuum of space for ten days, and still be alive when they returned to Earth. But tardigrades have made this journey. Here on Earth, they can survive without water by going into a state of suspended animation. Even after nine years a splash of water can revive them. No one is quite sure how tardigrades manage all this. Some experiments hint that they can turn their bodies into a liquid that’s as hard as a solid. Scientists call it biological glass.

Click here to order a copy of Science Ink: Tattoos of the Science Obsessed.

Click here to view the Science Tattoo Emporium.

[Tattoo by Shawn Hebrank at Identity Tattoo in Minneapolis, MN. Photo: Dylan Nelson (dylanjamesnelson.com)]

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Science Tattoo Emporium
NEW ON DISCOVER
OPEN
CITIZEN SCIENCE
ADVERTISEMENT

Discover's Newsletter

Sign up to get the latest science news delivered weekly right to your inbox!

The Loom

A blog about life, past and future. Written by DISCOVER contributing editor and columnist Carl Zimmer.
ADVERTISEMENT

See More

ADVERTISEMENT
Collapse bottom bar
+

Login to your Account

X
E-mail address:
Password:
Remember me
Forgot your password?
No problem. Click here to have it e-mailed to you.

Not Registered Yet?

Register now for FREE. Registration only takes a few minutes to complete. Register now »