How Tanks Went from War Curio to Homefront Hero

By Jeremy Hsu | November 30, 2017 11:44 pm
http://digital.nls.uk/first-world-war-official-photographs/archive/74549152

British tanks on training manoeuvres, in France, during World War I. This photograph of an advancing tank dwarfing British troops, gives an idea of the scale of tanks, and the power they brought to the front line in the last years of the war. The earliest models of tank were slow and excessively heavy, and struggled on wet ground, but later models were much more effective. Credit: National Library of Scotland | Tom Aitken

When the first tanks appeared on the battlefields of World War I, journalists described them as “grotesque creatures” and made comparisons to prehistoric animals such as dinosaurs. Even German prisoners of war supposedly laughed when recalling their first glimpse of the mechanical beasts. Later versions of British heavy tanks received an unflattering paint color known as “dog turd brown.” But 100 years ago, the first mass attack by hundreds of British tanks at the Battle of Cambrai signaled a huge change in modern warfare and even helped win civilian hearts and minds back home. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: technology, top posts

The Big Caveat on AI and Future Work

By Jeremy Hsu | November 30, 2017 7:06 pm
Amazon robots and human workers together in a warehouse. Credit: Amazon Robotics

Amazon robots and human workers together in a warehouse. Credit: Amazon Robotics

Artificial intelligence will likely both giveth and taketh away jobs for humans. A McKinsey Global Institute report estimates that automation could displace between 400 million and 800 million people worldwide by 2030, even as the report also suggests the benefits of automation could help create enough new jobs for displaced workers. But beyond the numbers, the report offers more useful lessons regardless of whether future work ultimately looks sunny or bleak. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: technology, top posts

Virtual Reality Immersion Beyond the Headset

By Jeremy Hsu | November 29, 2017 5:16 pm
A person trying out the "Tree" virtual reality experience by the New Reality Company. Credit: James Orlando

A person trying out the “Tree” virtual reality experience by the New Reality Company. Credit: James Orlando

Virtual reality experiences can provide an uncanny sense of immersion that tricks participants’ brains into believing they are walking on that narrow beam high above a city or are being chased by a monster through dark halls. The New Reality Company wants to push the boundaries of virtual reality by adding real-world props and additional sensory stimuli based on touch and smell–clever steps that can strengthen the power of immersion. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: mind & brain, technology, top posts

The Flying Car Future Is Leaving Wheels Behind

By Jeremy Hsu | October 28, 2017 7:21 pm
The Black Knight Transformer is a prototype flying car that can drive like a truck and fly like a helicopter. Credit: Advanced Tactics

The Black Knight Transformer is a prototype flying car that can drive like a truck and fly like a helicopter. Credit: Advanced Tactics

A prototype flying car that supposedly does the job of both a helicopter and a truck went up for sale on eBay a few days before Halloween. That privately-developed AT Black Knight Transformer represents a vision of the flying car future that has seemingly fallen out of favor as new startups in Silicon Valley and elsewhere pursue the idea of flying cars without wheels. But flying car enthusiasts or companies with specialized missions in mind may still find something to admire in the Black Knight Transformer’s hybrid flying car design. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: technology, top posts

Project Wing Drones Test Home Delivery Down Under

By Jeremy Hsu | October 25, 2017 5:38 pm
Project Wing delivery drone in Australia

Wing delivery drone flying over Queanbeyan, Australia. Credit: Project Wing

If you get food cravings or need to grab some over-the-counter medicine, chances are that you live just a short walk or drive away from a convenience store or pharmacy as long as you live in a city or the suburbs. But the Aussie residents of a certain rural community face a 40-minute round trip in the car whenever they want to pick up some ingredients for dinner or even grab a cup of coffee. That situation made them the ideal first customers for backyard drone deliveries through Project Wing, a delivery drone effort under Google’s parent company Alphabet. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: technology, top posts

Defibrillator Drones Aim to Respond in 911 Calls

By Jeremy Hsu | October 16, 2017 6:36 pm
By 2018, Flirtey drones could begin delivering defibrillators to help speed aid to victims of cardiac arrest. Credit: Andi Kilgore | Flirtey Inc.

By 2018, Flirtey drones could begin delivering defibrillators to help speed aid to victims of cardiac arrest. Credit: Andi Kilgore | Flirtey Inc.

Delivery drones carrying defibrillators could begin swooping in to save American victims of cardiac arrest starting in 2018. A new partnership between a delivery drone startup and an emergency medical services provider aims to dispatch defibrillator drones ahead of ambulances in response to 911 calls made in northern Nevada.

Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: technology, top posts

NASA Wants to Know Cost of Space Solar Power

By Jeremy Hsu | September 30, 2017 3:22 pm
Space solar power stations or satellites could someday beam energy down to Earth or to remote space mining operations

Space solar power stations or satellites could someday beam energy down to Earth or to remote space mining operations. Credit: NASA

Harnessing the sun’s energy with orbital space power stations and beaming the power to Earth has been a science fiction dream ever since Isaac Asimov wrote a 1941 short story called “Reason.” But the idea has never quite gotten off the ground despite decades of intermittent interest and research for the United States and other countries. NASA hopes to keep the idea going by funding a one-year study of how much it would cost to make commercially viable space-based solar power into a reality. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: technology, top posts

US Navy Debuts First Underwater Drone Squadron

By Jeremy Hsu | September 30, 2017 2:20 pm
Cmdr. Scott Smith, from Hartford, South Dakota, delivers remarks during the establishment ceremony for Unmanned Undersea Vehicle Squadron (UUVRON) 1.

Cmdr. Scott Smith, from Hartford, South Dakota, delivers remarks during the establishment ceremony for Unmanned Undersea Vehicle Squadron (UUVRON) 1. UUVRON 1 was originally a detachment that fell under commander, Submarine Development Squadron 5. Credit: U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Amanda R. Gray

The U.S. Navy has taken another step forward in deploying swarms of underwater drones for both scientific and military purposes. This past week, the Naval Undersea Warfare Center officially recognized the Navy’s first Unmanned Undersea Vehicle Squadron as likely the first of many military units dedicated to making use of undersea robots. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: technology, top posts

Friendly Neighborhood Delivery Drones Target Iceland

By Jeremy Hsu | September 22, 2017 7:49 pm
The startup Flytrex launched a delivery drone service in Reykjavik, Iceland starting in August 2017.

The startup Flytrex launched a delivery drone service in Reykjavik, Iceland starting in August 2017. Credit: Flytrex

Delivery drones are carrying customer orders for burgers and smartphones across a bay of water straddled by the Icelandic capital of Reykjavik—and that’s just the start of a much more ambitious plan. Before the end of 2017, the Israeli startup Flytrex envisions sending its delivery drones to the street corners of certain Reykjavik neighborhoods. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: technology, top posts

Rediscovered USS Indianapolis Embodies Pacific Victory

By Jeremy Hsu | August 21, 2017 5:51 pm
USS Indianapolis (CA 35) is shown off the Mare Island Navy Yard, in Northern California, July 10, 1945, after her final overhaul and repair of combat damage. The photo was taken before the ship delivered atomic bomb components to Tinian and just 20 days before she was sunk by a Japanese submarine. Credit: U.S. Navy

USS Indianapolis (CA 35) is shown off the Mare Island Navy Yard, in Northern California, July 10, 1945, after her final overhaul and repair of combat damage. The photo was taken before the ship delivered atomic bomb components to Tinian and just 20 days before she was sunk by a Japanese submarine. Credit: U.S. Navy

The sinking of the USS Indianapolis by an Japanese submarine in the closing days of World War II marked one of the U.S. Navy’s greatest maritime tragedies. But the recent rediscovery of the lost warship’s wreck on the bottom of the Pacific also represents a chance to remember how its wartime career paralleled the U.S. road to victory in the Pacific theater of war—a victory built upon industrial might and the ability to wage a long war. Read More

CATEGORIZED UNDER: technology, top posts
NEW ON DISCOVER
OPEN
CITIZEN SCIENCE
ADVERTISEMENT

Lovesick Cyborg

Lovesick Cyborg examines how technology shapes our human experience of the world on both an emotional and physical level. I’ll focus on stories such as why audiences loved or hated Hollywood’s digital resurrection of fallen actors, how soldiers interact with battlefield robots and the capability of music fans to idolize virtual pop stars. Other stories might include the experience of using an advanced prosthetic limb, whether or not people trust driverless cars with their lives, and how virtual reality headsets or 3-D film technology can make some people physically ill.
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

See More

Discover's Newsletter

Sign up to get the latest science news delivered weekly right to your inbox!

Collapse bottom bar
+