Our closest relatives – a visual tour of the primates

By Ed Yong | March 17, 2011 5:00 pm

Few groups of animals hold such special significance for us as the primates – the apes, monkeys, lemurs and more. This is the group that we are a part of. Its members are familiar and charismatic, but our evolutionary history is tangled and occasionally controversial.

Now, Polina Perelman has provided the most comprehensive view of the primate family tree to date. Her team sequenced genes from over 186 species, representing 90% of all the genera that we know of. Her tree confirms some past ideas about primate evolution and clarifies other controversies. It’s a story of island conquests, shrinking bodies, tangled branches and ancient relics. This slide show tells that story.

Reference: Perelman P, Johnson WE, Roos C, Seuánez HN, Horvath JE, et al. (2011) A Molecular Phylogeny of Living Primates. PLoS Genet 7(3): e1001342.

old_world_monkeys
apes
aye_aye
colugo
golden_lion_tamarin
lemurs
mandrill
old_world_monkeys2
platyrrhine
plesiadapis
priimates
pygmy_marmoset
siamang
slow_loris
strepsirrhines
tarsier

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