Neurons transplanted into mouse spines reverse chronic pain

By Ed Yong | May 24, 2012 11:10 am

Several neural diseases, including chronic pain and epilepsy, involve a lack of restraint. That is, damage to nerves in the spine reduces the levels of a signalling chemical called GABA, which silences excitable neurons. The result: too much neural activity.

There are drugs that can restore GABA, but they don’t always work, they are only temporary and they have unwanted side effects like sedation. There is another option: transplant GABA-producing neurons directly into the spine. Scientists have now done this in mice, with successful results.

I covered the story for The Scientist. Check it out.

Photo by Nanny Snowflake

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Neuroscience and psychology
MORE ABOUT: pain

Comments (2)

  1. Jim Johnson

    I wonder if this would affect other diseases of erroneously excited neurons, such as with tinnitus?

  2. G

    Okay, this is usually used in very diffeent context, but…

    SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY.

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