Search Results for 'i\'ve got your missing links'

I've got your missing links right here (20 August 2011)

August 21, 2011 | By

Because of the Peru trip, I had limited time to read/aggregate this week so this selection of links is a bit truncated and unsorted. Normal service to resume next week. Top picks Wow. How Carl Zimmer inspired two scientists (&many more) in their scientific lives. Guy sees Fibonacci sequence in trees, sets up experiments, develops […]

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I've got your missing links right here (13 August 2011)

August 13, 2011 | By

Top picks Spoiler warning: spoilers don’t spoil experiences, by Jonah Lehrer Should you have the right to be “forgotten” online? In Europe, lawsuits & talk of regulations The science of yodelling. Pure joy by Jennifer Ouellette. I’d quote a bit, but it’s just golden throughout. Why do people confess to crimes they haven’t committed. A […]

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I've got your missing links right here (21 May 2011)

May 21, 2011 | By

Top thirteen picks “It’s not a disease. It doesn’t need curing.” Steve Silberman talks to John Robison, a “free-range Aspergian” and best-selling author. How to fund research so that it generates insanely great ideas, not pretty good ones – an awesome piece by Tim Harford. Looking for empathy – v.good account of fMRI experiments in […]

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I've got your missing links right here (30 April 2011)

April 30, 2011 | By

Top thirteen picks Euthanasia Coaster – how to design an actual killer coaster, by Jennifer Ouellette. Note, this post features Fabio vs a goose Smash moons together rip Saturn’s rings off destroy universes yeeaaahhhhhhhhhhhhh A neurologist finishes his last paper, on the disease that’s killing him. Beautiful stuff about lyrebirds as historians, by Robert Kruylwich. […]

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I've got your missing links right here (23 April 2011)

April 23, 2011 | By

Top twelve picks Adam Rutherford’s documentary The Gene Code was an utter triumph – complex and cutting-edge science rendered clear and compelling. Let’s pause for a second and note that the UK is a country where we talk about Archaea and recombination in detail on national TV. For this alone, Adam is my hero. Eric […]

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I've got your missing links right here (12 February 2011)

February 12, 2011 | By

Top twelve picks An amazing post by Greg Downey on “uncontacted tribes” and the perils of using technical terms that sound like everyday ones. Does grief proceed through five stages? Is it better to let it all out? Here’s a stonking debunking of myths about grief, including the surprising origins of the “stages of grief” […]

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Arsenic Bacteria 4: The Quest for Peace

December 18, 2010 | By

The arsenic bacteria story continued to roll on over the last week, but at a slower pace. Many of the big issues have already been covered at length, including the paper itself, the media hype, the implications for journalism, peer review, and so on (see my post-mortem from last week for a timeline; and my […]

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I've got your missing links right here (4th December 2010)

December 4, 2010 | By

A shorter list this week, because I spent two days leaking rhinoviruses… Top five picks So, the arsenic bacteria. For anyone not paying attention, bacteria in Mono Lake (a) can possibly incorporate arsenic into their DNA and other important molecules, (b) aren’t aliens, and (c) don’t represent another origin of life. Curtis Brainard covers the […]

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I've got your missing links right here – 20th November 2010

November 20, 2010 | By

Top ten from the week This is an incredible story about a surprising 1918 autopsy, beautifully told by Maryn McKenna, whose Superbug blog has rapidly shot up to the top echelons of my favourites list. “I like to think the worst is over, but it’s coming up to the first anniversary and it’s something I’ll […]

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I've got your missing links right here (25th September 2010)

September 25, 2010 | By

“And then that just led to this very weird erotism moment when people were practically hugging each other while eating these live insects.” A fascinating NYT piece on eating insects, which John Rennie expands upon. Read the water-bug bit in particular. “Tt posed a problem that none of the other edible insects that night did: […]

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