Tag: arctic tern

Chasing daylight – tiny trackers reveal the incredible flight plans of the Arctic tern

By Ed Yong | January 14, 2010 5:07 pm

I’ve just flown from London to North Carolina, a trip of around 6,200km. As flights go, it’s a pathetic one, a mere jaunt in the park compared to the epic voyage of the Arctic tern. Every year, this greatest of animal travellers makes a 70,000 km round-trip, in a relentless, globe-trotting pursuit of daylight. In summer, it spends its time in the sun-soaked Arctic and in winter, it heads for the equally bright climes of Antarctica. In its 30 years of life, this champion aeronaut flies more than 2.4 million kilometres – the equivalent of three return journeys to the Moon.  

The Arctic tern’s marathon flight is fairly familiar, but estimating the length of such a massive trek isn’t easy. It would be charitable to forgive scientists for getting it wrong, given that they had to rely on observations at sea and capturing banded birds at different places. But few would have predicted just how wrong the textbook figures are. They typically suggest that the tern covers 40,000km in a year. The bird should be insulted – in reality, it flies almost twice that amount.

Its true itinerary has only just been revealed through the use of tiny tracking devices. Similar machines have already exposed the travel plans of larger seabirds like albatrosses, petrels and shearwaters. But these gadgets been too large and clunky to attach to smaller fliers – strapping a 400g recorder to a 100g bird isn’t going to give you an accurate picture of its flying abilities.

Carsten Egevang from Denmark’s Aarhus University changed all of that by developing tiny geolocators, less than 1g in weight. These locators can track the movements of migrating birds by recording the amount of light falling upon it at different points in its journey, and they’ve already been baptised by recording the entire migration of songbirds. Egevang strapped them to the leg of 50 terns, and managed to retrieve 11 of them the following season, when the birds returned.

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