Wasabi Receptors and Smart Sushi Labels

By Ashton Yoon | March 27, 2017 9:52 pm

wasabi-receptor_custom-c20a4671dc132eb62d5d608cd87597ea1875f4cf-s800-c85

Researchers at UCSF have elucidated the structure of the receptor that makes our sensory nerves tingle when we eat wasabi.

As this receptor is important in our perception of pain, knowing its shape should help in the development of new pain medications. A company called Thinfilm, developed very thin, electronic label that tracks vital information about certain foods at each stage of the supply chain. This way, foods like sashimi salmon can have its temperature monitored from the warehouse to the grocery store, supplying information the consumer can use to decide whether to buy it.

The label offers a more accurate expiration date which could help decrease food waste and the number of cases of food-borne illnesses.

Sushi Science: A 3-D View of the Body’s Wasabi Receptor – NPR: Shots

Your Sushi May Be Getting Smarter – The Atlantic

CATEGORIZED UNDER: What We're Reading
ADVERTISEMENT
  • http://www.mazepath.com/uncleal/qz4.htm Uncle Al

    Ground wasabi has an aesthetic life of perhaps an hour. Common “wasabi” is dyed horseradish at a small fraction of its namesake’s cost and little of its flavor other than heat.

NEW ON DISCOVER
OPEN
CITIZEN SCIENCE
ADVERTISEMENT

Science & Food

Science & Food brings you content on food and science including but not limited to: the scientific and culinary aspects of food that you eat; how knowledge of science and technology can be used to make better food; how science is integral to understanding the impact of food on our health and environment; as well as profiles of scientists and chefs that are advancing the frontiers of science and food.
ADVERTISEMENT

See More

ADVERTISEMENT

Discover's Newsletter

Sign up to get the latest science news delivered weekly right to your inbox!

Collapse bottom bar
+