As the weather warms up, watch out for lime disease.

By Seriously Science | March 27, 2017 6:00 am
Image: Flickr/Mark Hillary

Image: Flickr/Mark Hillary

Make no mistake, contact dermatitis is no joke, as this poor woman learned firsthand. The culprit? Squeezing limes and lemons for a large batch of sangria followed by exposure to the sun without sunscreen, which resulted in giant blisters on her hands the next day. Ouch! If you dare, check out the image of the poor woman’s fingers linked to below. It’s… intense.

Phytophotodermatitis from making sangria: a phototoxic reaction to lime and lemon juice.

“A 26-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a painful blistering eruption on her hands. She had been squeezing limes and lemons while making sangria the previous day. She had spent the rest of the day outdoors in the sun without sunscreen. Hours later, she experienced a painful burning erythema followed by the formation of large, tense bullae on her hands (Figure 1). She was otherwise healthy and had no history of exposure to poison ivy or poison oak or to phototoxic drugs (e.g., naproxen and tetracycline), topical fragrances or other photosensitizing products that would make one consider the differential diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis, drug-induced photosensitivity or pseudoporphyria. She had been seen in the emergency department on two previous occasions for similar presentations.”

Click here to see figure 1. (NSFW)

Related content:
Too much eye contact can actually cause hallucinations.
I’m so rich, I’m allergic to money.
When you’re allergic to your toilet seat.

ADVERTISEMENT
  • http://secure93.com Frank Coleman

    I was paid 104000 dollars past 12 months by doing an online work as well as I was able to do it by w­orking in my own time f­o­r quite a few hours every day. I applied work opportunity I came across online and so I am excited that I was in the position to earn such decent money. It is seriously newbie-friendly and therefore I’m so grateful that I found out regarding it. Have a look at exactly what I do… http://b1z­.­org/37Y

  • http://padraeg.wordpress.com/ Patrick Sullivan

    no history of exposure to poison ivy or poison oak or to phototoxic drugs (e.g., naproxen and tetracycline), topical fragrances or other photosensitizing products that would make one consider the differential diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis, drug-induced photosensitivity or pseudoporphyria. She had been seen in the emergency department on two previous occasions for similar presentations.”

NEW ON DISCOVER
OPEN
CITIZEN SCIENCE
ADVERTISEMENT

Seriously, Science?

Seriously, Science?, formerly known as NCBI ROFL, is the brainchild of two prone-to-distraction biologists. We highlight the funniest, oddest, and just plain craziest research from the PubMed research database and beyond. Because nobody said serious science couldn't be silly!
Follow us on Twitter: @srslyscience.
Send us paper suggestions: srslyscience[at]gmail.com.
ADVERTISEMENT

See More

ADVERTISEMENT

Discover's Newsletter

Sign up to get the latest science news delivered weekly right to your inbox!

Collapse bottom bar
+