Personal genome in the public domain

By Razib Khan | February 21, 2011 1:15 am


Image credit: Vikrum Lexicon

Manu Sporny reflects on one week of being in the public domain in terms of personal genomics. I already pulled down his data, as has Zack. The whole post is fascinating, but this is really interesting: “I found out that it’s illegal to send any of your genetic material outside of Russia to have it analyzed.” In a related vein, seen Dr. Daniel MacArthur’s When “Cautious” Means “Useless.” I know that 23andMe is a for-profit business in it to make money for its backers, but there are certainly huge social spillover effects among my set in its bringing 500,000 to 1 million markers to the masses. It’s a clear concrete case of how innovation can result in positive gains across society. I am not a knee-jerk libertarian, but your genetic data is your genetic data. Own it, analyze it, and claim it!

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Genetics, Genomics
MORE ABOUT: Personal Genome

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This blog is about evolution, genetics, genomics and their interstices. Please beware that comments are aggressively moderated. Uncivil or churlish comments will likely get you banned immediately, so make any contribution count!

About Razib Khan

I have degrees in biology and biochemistry, a passion for genetics, history, and philosophy, and shrimp is my favorite food. In relation to nationality I'm a American Northwesterner, in politics I'm a reactionary, and as for religion I have none (I'm an atheist). If you want to know more, see the links at http://www.razib.com

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