Guest posts @ Sepia Mutiny

By Razib Khan | March 26, 2011 10:15 pm

Since it doesn’t show up in my total content aggregator (RSS), and I don’t know how to author filter Movable Type posts easily, I thought I would point to my guest posts over at the Sepia Mutiny weblog:

Speaking of a demonstration in Pakistan….

The decline of Hindi among American brown folk

A civilization of regions

Do that Guju you do!

The undersampled 1 billion (genetically that is)

If you don’t know about the blog, here’s the Wikipedia entry. I’ve been commenting on that site since its inception in the summer of 2004, as two friends were co-founders.

Addendum: I push all the stuff in my total content aggregator to my twitter account, Gene Expression Facebook page (though this includes GNXP.com posts not by me), and my Facebook page. I’ve also got a NetworkedBlogs page which you can subscribe to or something. Probably other things I’ve forgotten about to be honest (e.g., here’s my Talk Islam author page. Don’t contribute there anymore).  Also, I should mention that Razib on Books has its own domain, razibkhanbooks.com. Everything posted there is pushed into the total content aggregator, and the “posts” will usually be pointers to this weblog anyhow, but here’s the specific feed if you care (someone inquired, so someone cares!).

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Blog
MORE ABOUT: Blog, Sepia Mutiny
  • http://dioegenesartemis.blogspot.com/ Diogenes

    Interesting posts… Hadn’t read them although I’ve been reading your contributions to the subject here for a long time.

    I don’t see how ASI could be traditional forager though. I believe a major reorganization of mindset would be necessary for effective conversion to advanced agricultural lifestyles. Foragers are (or were as I doubt any “pure” ones remain nowdays) highly intelligent, no doubt, but their thinking was likely subtly but most significantly different, their notions of future and past would be different, their cooperation mindsets different.
    If ANI could succeed easily in the South, all Indians would be perhaps as much as >90% ANI today. If their crops were less useful there, ASI would only have to wait for rice-carrying Yellow-riverers to completely overwhelm them, particularly in South China and Southeast Asia. This now appears to me to have been the case with foragers in colder/poorer soils in Northern Europe. Survived the first onslaught of wheat/barley-agriculturalists loosing rich land only, until finally overwhelmed by rye-carrying + pastoralist Fertile Crescenters.
    ASI survival must mean, IMO, that they already had, at least in an incipient form, many of the necessary adaptations. Which would explain how subsets of them developed advanced agriculture in difficult circumstances elsewhere…
    Interestingly, this may mean that Yellow Riverers, Fertile Crescenters and ASI-like populations may have convergently evolved a set of atributes for the same purpose, but possibly in different ways culturally and genetically. If mostly additive long-term, and in an adequate environment: rich (but necessarily also unstable) grounds indeed…

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This blog is about evolution, genetics, genomics and their interstices. Please beware that comments are aggressively moderated. Uncivil or churlish comments will likely get you banned immediately, so make any contribution count!

About Razib Khan

I have degrees in biology and biochemistry, a passion for genetics, history, and philosophy, and shrimp is my favorite food. In relation to nationality I'm a American Northwesterner, in politics I'm a reactionary, and as for religion I have none (I'm an atheist). If you want to know more, see the links at http://www.razib.com

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