I pledge my full genome to the public domain

By Razib Khan | December 6, 2011 8:42 am

I expect to get my full genome sequenced in a few years, at the latest. When that happens, I’ll try and place it online at a public repository. Why? There’s something of a chicken and egg issue with the utility of genomes. The more you have out there, the more juice you can squeeze. I’m going to add phenotypic information too. You probably aren’t surprised by this stance from me, but I just realized that if there are ~30,000 human genomes sequenced right now…it’s probably impossible logistically and bureaucratically (and perhaps computationally, right now) to analyze them all at the same time. The 1000 Genomes is going to make a big difference. But if you look at their list of populations surveyed over time you’ll see that there have been several false-starts, probably due to bureaucratic problems.

Perhaps I’m naive, but my thought is that it’s fine to look at common diseases and common variants. But how are we going to find rare variants if we can’t pool lots and lots of individuals? I suspect it’s a matter of time anyway, and why not push on the margin? I invite readers and other bloggers to make the same pledge. I’ve been blogging since 2002, so I suspect you’ll be in a position to ask me what the status is in ~2013. I hear from people all the time that human genomics is “scary.” Well, I’m not scared, and I’m going to try and show that my lack of fear is more than just words.

CATEGORIZED UNDER: Personal Genomics
MORE ABOUT: Personal genomics
  • Sherry Nouraini

    Donating data to the public for the benefit of science is a noble thing. However, living in US, I’d be worried about health insurance companies discriminating against you because you might have the SNPs to make you a candidate for a particular disease. I believe in open science, but when it comes to my genome, I’d rather keep it private.

  • http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp Razib Khan

    #2, i already have a genotype in the public domain fyi (re: SNPs).

  • Jacob Roberson

    For future reference, right-handed men don’t hold their doodle with their left. It’s just one of those things.

  • Jacob Roberson

    (For the trivia-impaired, it’s from this movie.)

  • http://www.zackvision.com/weblog/ Zack

    Count me in too.

  • http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp Razib Khan

    #5, runs-of-homozygosity in-da-house!

  • DK

    The 1000 Genomes is going to make a big difference. But if you look at their list of populations surveyed over time you’ll see that there have been several false-starts, probably due to bureaucratic problems.

    Just looked at the list of PGP participants. 754 names. Does it really take 754 people to sequence and analyze 1000 genomes? Seems like bureaucratic overhead is considerable.

  • Jason Malloy

    This is something I’d like to do eventually as well.

  • Chris Maloney

    I pledge to put my genome in the public domain, for the benefit of science.

  • http://sidudoexisto.blogspot.com Jorge Laris

    “I hear from people all the time that human genomics is ‘scary.’” Yeah, I heard it once from my uncle. She told me that the’re scary because they take away what makes us human and spacial by showing us how close to nature we are. What do you think?

  • Ken

    I just know that someone will object to this, since it means you’re also putting 99.9% or so of everyone’s genome in the public domain. And by “someone” I mean of course some genomic company that’s trying to patent ATPase, or something equally ridiculous.

  • ackbark

    This would have the effect that if your complete genome is among the first out there it will be among the first that get generally researched so finding a cure for any particular ailment you might have would get a head start.

NEW ON DISCOVER
OPEN
CITIZEN SCIENCE
ADVERTISEMENT

Discover's Newsletter

Sign up to get the latest science news delivered weekly right to your inbox!

Gene Expression

This blog is about evolution, genetics, genomics and their interstices. Please beware that comments are aggressively moderated. Uncivil or churlish comments will likely get you banned immediately, so make any contribution count!

About Razib Khan

I have degrees in biology and biochemistry, a passion for genetics, history, and philosophy, and shrimp is my favorite food. In relation to nationality I'm a American Northwesterner, in politics I'm a reactionary, and as for religion I have none (I'm an atheist). If you want to know more, see the links at http://www.razib.com

ADVERTISEMENT

See More

ADVERTISEMENT

RSS Razib’s Pinboard

Edifying books

Collapse bottom bar
+

Login to your Account

X
E-mail address:
Password:
Remember me
Forgot your password?
No problem. Click here to have it e-mailed to you.

Not Registered Yet?

Register now for FREE. Registration only takes a few minutes to complete. Register now »